"Unconsciously, I was writing from a more personal perspective, which is just a natural progression when so much is happening in your life," she says. "It kind of finds its way onto the record even if you’re not really aware of it. As a songwriter, I think it’s important that you’re trying to work towards honesty in your writing. So when I saw that was happening, I didn’t try to fight it or obscure it."
Read the full feature (from UTR #48) here.

"Unconsciously, I was writing from a more personal perspective, which is just a natural progression when so much is happening in your life," she says. "It kind of finds its way onto the record even if you’re not really aware of it. As a songwriter, I think it’s important that you’re trying to work towards honesty in your writing. So when I saw that was happening, I didn’t try to fight it or obscure it."

Read the full feature (from UTR #48) here.

Visually I love the works of people like Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. I was always really interested in what happened there in the 40s and after the war. This period with all this creativity by Mexican artists and others drawn there. There are some really amazing female figures like Dolores Del Rio. She was the first Mexican star to cross over to Hollywood. She was very dramatic, very passionate and very much about expressing her sexual power. That’s not really what I am trying to get across, but her look definitely inspired me. Also the way Frida Kahlo addressed themes about being a woman in a way that was quite taboo at the time is inspiring. She wasn’t afraid to be a woman, and show her pain at the same time. It’s really important to show vulnerability and strength. That you can’t just be one or another

Anna Calvi  (via heystellaaaa)

oohdesire:

 Anna’s official FB page linked this interview and it’s brilliant. I love that part:

I find it incredibly frustrating that female artists and male artists get treated differently. Female artists are far too often judged on how they appear. What I’ve loved about the media coverage you’ve had is that the narrative has centred around your brilliance as a songwriter and you as a creative force, rather than how you appear or what you wear. Am I being incredibly naive there, or do you feel that, too?

I do feel lucky that my musical vision has been strong enough to avoid that trap. However, I often get asked what it’s like to be a woman in music. I’ve spoken to other female artists and they also continually get asked this question. It’s frustrating that women are regarded as ‘female artists’ as opposed to ‘artists’, which is how men are regarded. I doubt male artists get asked what it’s like to be a man making music. I really hope this fascination with gender won’t last forever and we can all just focus on the music.

Do you consider yourself a feminist?

I think it’s really important that women and men reclaim the word feminism. Feminism is about equality. It’s about being inclusive, not exclusive.  So, yes, I do consider myself a feminist. I don’t believe that ultimately the patriarchy serves men any better than it serves women. The pressures on men and women to live up to their gender stereotypes are ridiculous and impossible to fulfill.

Like wow, finally a journalist who doesn’t ask completely shallow questions and highlights how intelligent, articulate and relevant of a person Anna is.